Logan: sad, beautiful and final

James Mangold is a compelling director; in that a lot of his work has real emotional depth and nuance, and often benefits from repeat viewing. And he’s kind of underappreciated. I mean, Girl, Interrupted, 3:10 To Yuma and Walk The Line all had him at the helm. And yes, granted, he’s also got The Wolverine on his… Continue reading Logan: sad, beautiful and final

The Leftovers: season two review

Where does one begin with The Leftovers? It’s safe to say it’s like no other show out there. For sure, it has shades of other shows, mostly drama. But there’s a lot in there, and a lot that’ll go over your head (it did mine). It’s also maddeningly infuriating too. As viewers and consumers and… Continue reading The Leftovers: season two review

Ex Machina: Lessons in playing God

Alex Garland is a mighty fine writer. He’s now a director. His past writing credits include The Beach, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Never Let Me Go, Dredd and now Ex Machina. With the latter he’s stepped up to the director’s chair, and done so without missing a beat. He’s been helped by a great cast… Continue reading Ex Machina: Lessons in playing God

Wild: Witherspoon’s epic journey of discovery

Reese Witherspoon is due a good performance. The last time she gave one, let’s be honest, was as June Carter in Walk The Line in 2005. Since then she’s been coasting a little with below par rom-coms and the like. However that’s water under the bridge now, or snow down the mountain, whatever wilderness phrase… Continue reading Wild: Witherspoon’s epic journey of discovery

The Leftovers: season one review

The brainchild of novelist Tom Perrotta and brought to the small screen with the help of Damon Lindelof (the chap that drove most of us mad with frustration for years with Lost), The Leftovers was an unexpectedly beautiful and tragically poignant portrayal of the way society – and the world at large – copes with… Continue reading The Leftovers: season one review