Favourite female film characters with brightly coloured hair

Someone I know recently dyed her hair pink. She’d previously had it purple, or was it green or blue? I forget, whatever the colour I remember it looked cool at the time, because, let’s face it, if you’ve got bright hair you’re automatically fifty per cent more interesting than most of us.

I mean… it’s the same with someone with unusual tattoos. Are they more creative? More artistic? A tortured soul? Perhaps they are. I’d like to hope they are. Whether they are or not, I find these artistic additions and enhancements to people’s outward-facing personas to be endlessly fascinating. I get drawn in, like a moth to a flame.

And this got me thinking, as I do, about characters in film with bright hair, as there are a bunch – from Natalie Portman’s stripper in Closer to manic pixie dream girl Ramona Flowers in Scott Pilgrim. I am sure there are lots more, but below are a few I thought I’d pick out.

Who would yours be?

Natalie Portman as Alice in Closer (2004)

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Milla Jovovich as Leeloo in The Fifth Element (1997)

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Angelina Jolie as Gia Curangi in Gia (1998)

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Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Romana Flowers in Scott Pilgrim Vs The World (2010)

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Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Noni in Beyond The Lights (2014)

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Lea Seydoux as Emma in Blue Is The Warmest Colour (2013)

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Kate Winslet as Clara in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

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SPECTRE: Mendes does Bond’s greatest hits

Poor old Sam Mendes. In some ways he’s a victim of his own success. Skyfall broke a billion at the box office so it was a tough act to follow. Particularly if that act was yourself.

But Dan and Sam formed a superb working relationship on Skyfall, so why wouldn’t they roll the dice again? And roll they did, upping the stakes by introducing the shadowy organisation SPECTRE, helmed by the Bond franchise’s favourite go-to bad guy, Blofeld (Christoph Waltz).

For SPECTRE we start in Mexico in an impressive Day of the Dead sequence which sees Bond bring his usual suave and swagger to proceedings. A solid opener.

So far so Live and Let Die.

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From there – much like the whole of the Craig era so far – the story continues to explore the path of the previous films, particularly Skyfall, with Bond and the double O programme being seen as obsolete in a modern world where drones and data reign supreme. Leading the charge is the nefarious C (Andrew Scott); giving M (Ralph Fiennes) a foil of his own. Old school versus new school you might say.

And as the story unfolds echoes of Craig’s reign as Bond keep cropping up, almost like a final send-off. Is this his last film?

And as well as the Craig era references it seemed Mendes bowed to fan pressure and brought back a number of classic tropes. You could probably play a drinking game with the deluge of Bond references on show and end up hammered way before the second act.

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Generally though, in terms of a Bond story, this does feel tonally like it’s closer to the original books, perhaps more so than Casino Royale (still the best Craig Bond). But the problem this film finds itself in, more than anything, is despite attempting to have a natural evolution from the past few stories, it feels cobbled together. Our hero races from one set piece and country to the next and it all feels forced. With loose threads and characters dropped at various points to keep the story moving along it seemed the writers had leapt on a runaway train and had no idea how to stop it.

Simple stories are often the hardest to tell and, in this case, it feels as if the filmmakers have overcomplicated things. And somehow, bafflingly, they’ve put themselves in a place where, despite trying to continue the story from past outings, they still have to world build and introduce new characters. And that always takes time.

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So for me, SPECTRE the organisation and SPECTRE the film promised so much but delivered relatively little. Again, this is probably partially down to Sam Mendes impressing us all with his first go round, but for the most part this latest franchise entry just underwhelmed me.

Trying to pin down the reasons behind my feeling (or lack of it) I think was partly due to the story feeling clunky and numerous characters being short-changed. And when they did show up they barely made an impact (Monica Bellucci and Dave Bautista, the top suspects). Those that did get more scenes also didn’t really leap off the screen (Andrew Scott for example, just seemed unhappy to be there).

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And some just didn’t seem to fit the film properly at all; specifically Lea Seydoux as Bond’s love interest. Now she’s French, so I wonder whether they were trying to replicate the Eva Green effect with Craig? That fizzled at the time. Here though, Seydoux does perfectly well, but just seems too young and cute to be the right fit. Whether it’s actually an age thing I don’t know (Craig is 47, Seydoux is 30), but I’m not entirely buying that. Chemistry is chemistry, and here it didn’t work.

Or maybe Mendes just had other fish to fry? In particular Christoph Waltz as Blofeld. Waltz, if you give him good lines, will make them sing and dance for you. Yet here, as the powerful and troubled head of SPECTRE, he didn’t seem that frightening. He also didn’t have many scenes which really came alive. He’s undoubtedly a terrific actor, but it seemed like he was either coasting or didn’t have much to work with.

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Now many critics (and fans) have raved about this film already. Strong opening weekend, Mendes, Craig and the gang back together again and all that… so maybe I’m being harsh but I’ll stick to my guns. Bond is the longest running franchise in cinematic history (excluding the Carry On films, wahey!) and its standards are high, so we expect more. And I’m not even a rabid fan.

I am, however, a huge fan of Casino Royale and Skyfall and some past Bonds (I grew up in the Pierce Brosnan era), but each new instalment should surpass the last, and this one just trod water. Which simply isn’t acceptable. Judi Dench’s M would never have stood for it.

Ooh la la… my cinematic French fancies!

swimming-pool-2003-08-gThere’s a certain indefinable something about the modern-day French actress. Ok, sorry, it’s a lazy line even without saying it. However, the point stands. The appeal is hard to pinpoint but it’s undoubtedly there.

Is it just the sexy accent? Or the fact we’re – well, most of us – drawn to the exotic? We all like a bit of mystery. And acting wise, these ladies deliver that effortlessly, hypnotically luring us in like the sexy sirens they are. You have been warned.

Let’s start with the newcomers. The first two are both in the same film, yet really should get a special nod for their committed and naturalistic performances. Breakout performances too, as they’re both now on many people’s radars. Then we have another breakout performance, this time from Ms. Thierry in Terry Gilliam’s latest mind-bending dystopian offering.

Lea Seydoux and Adele Exarchopolous
Blue Is The Warmest Colour


Melanie Thierry

The Zero Theorem


Next up are the mid-range ladies. They pop up from time to time, often in scene stealing fashion. Either by being impossibly cute, seductive, beguiling, or all three rolled into one.

Ludivine Sagnier
Swimming Pool, Mesrine: Killer Instinct/Public Enemy #1


Clemence Poesy

In Bruges, Birdsong, Harry Potter


Melanie Laurent

Inglourious Basterds, Now You See Me


And then there’s the heavy hitters. In recent years two ladies have to share top spot; both are deadly, unpredictable, enchanting and really quite brilliant at what they do. Both hold the screen incredibly well and have film CVs that range from blockbusters to sweet little indies.

In terms of an impressive body of work over a longer time period, you’d have to give the title to Marion. However, there’s something enigmatic and downright dangerous about Eva and the way she portrays characters. As such, I’m calling this an admirable draw.

Eva Green
The Dreamers, Casino Royale, Cracks, Dark Shadows, 300: Rise of an Empire. Next up? Sin City: A Dame To Kill For, Penny Dreadful.


Marion Cotillard

Taxi, La Vie En Rose, Public Enemies, Inception, Little White Lies, Midnight in Paris, Rust and Bone, The Dark Knight Rises. Next up? The Immigrant.


For my list I’ve really only looked at modern actresses, so no Bridget Bardot, Sophie Marceau, Beatrice Dalle and those of a similar time. So what do you think? Did I miss anyone? Thoughts on these ladies?

Until next time.