Logan: sad, beautiful and final

James Mangold is a compelling director; in that a lot of his work has real emotional depth and nuance, and often benefits from repeat viewing. And he’s kind of underappreciated. I mean, Girl, Interrupted, 3:10 To Yuma and Walk The Line all had him at the helm. And yes, granted, he’s also got The Wolverine on his… Continue reading Logan: sad, beautiful and final

A Monster Calls: deeply sad and moving

Quality over quantity. That seems to be how Spanish director Juan Antonio Bayona has approached his career thus far. His first feature length was The Orphanage (2007), then the immensely sad The Impossible (2012), which was a critical and commercial success. And now, at the start of the new year, he gives us likely Oscar… Continue reading A Monster Calls: deeply sad and moving

The Leftovers: season two review

Where does one begin with The Leftovers? It’s safe to say it’s like no other show out there. For sure, it has shades of other shows, mostly drama. But there’s a lot in there, and a lot that’ll go over your head (it did mine). It’s also maddeningly infuriating too. As viewers and consumers and… Continue reading The Leftovers: season two review

Wild: Witherspoon’s epic journey of discovery

Reese Witherspoon is due a good performance. The last time she gave one, let’s be honest, was as June Carter in Walk The Line in 2005. Since then she’s been coasting a little with below par rom-coms and the like. However that’s water under the bridge now, or snow down the mountain, whatever wilderness phrase… Continue reading Wild: Witherspoon’s epic journey of discovery

The Leftovers: season one review

The brainchild of novelist Tom Perrotta and brought to the small screen with the help of Damon Lindelof (the chap that drove most of us mad with frustration for years with Lost), The Leftovers was an unexpectedly beautiful and tragically poignant portrayal of the way society – and the world at large – copes with… Continue reading The Leftovers: season one review

Labor Day: Reitman’s most heartfelt film?

As a director, Jason Reitman appears to be growing up fast. Labor Day is the fifth feature length film he’s given us and his progression as a storyteller is clear to see. This film, set in a sleepy suburban American town in 1987, tells the story of Henry (Gattlin Griffith) and his mother Adele (Kate… Continue reading Labor Day: Reitman’s most heartfelt film?