The Get Down: season one, part two – review

TV

The Get Down was, by its own admission, a hugely ambitious undertaking by Baz Luhrmann and his team. With a sizeable investment from Netflix (although they’re seemingly unstoppable these days, so whatever). So it meant that a lot was riding on this tale of late ‘70s New York, painted as a city in crisis – at least in the Bronx, where most of our story takes place.

Plus it’s a sprawling epic. 

It touches on poverty, drugs, sexuality, inner city regeneration, friendship and male bonding, graffiti and self-expression, religion, and the birth of hip-hop, and how music can change your life and those around you. And that’s just for starters.

Which means that, with great ambition comes great responsibility. I mean, this show built itself up to tackle A LOT of weighty subjects and it does so quite well, for the most part. But derails a little come the second half of the season, which we’ll get to.

Moreover, maybe it bit off more than it could chew, with all these subjects vying for screen time. It made it hard to get a handle on the main thrust of the story at times. Was it part documentary, musical, love story, social commentary, musical history lesson or gangster movie? Or all of the above? The mind is liable to boggle.

Which meant, that if you wanted to pick holes in the plot, you could. You’d find loads. But the show’s sheer exuberance and enthusiasm for its material more or less carried it through. And this was helped, in part, by numerous punch-the-air musical moments, delivered by a highly watchable cast. In particular Ekeziel ‘Zeke’ Figuero (Justice Smith), the wordsmith of The Get Down Brothers (loosely modelled on the birth of the Sugar Hill Gang) and Mylene Cruz (Herizen Guardiola) a blossoming disco star; herself trying to break away from the clutches of a religiously overzealous father and the fact she’s come from more or less nothing. 

For all its ambition though, it’s a show of two halves (to coin a football pundit phrase). In that the first half introduced the main characters – framed via a modern-day rap concert (with Nas playing a grown-up Zeke) – and set them on their path to musical glory well enough. And was stylised much like a musical, all primary colours and big hair.

But then it seemed the second half of the season thought it best to get high on its own supply. Which meant it, rather oddly, got pretty trippy. We had the introduction of numerous animated sections in each episode which, whilst fun, seemed like a device to help Baz and his overworked crew take a breather whilst they set up the next big musical set piece. 

The plot, too, seemed a bit spaced out. There were really too many story strands drifting around the place to fully invest in any of them. And by the time the finish rolled around, I was left feeling like I’d seen something quite good, but also quite confused about what it wanted to be.

So top marks for ambition, casting, musical numbers and vision. But sorry Baz, you’re getting a little marked down for execution and story. Still though, overall, it’s a decent show and worth catching. Particularly if you’re a fan of hip-hop and experiencing a little slice of the birth of a musical genre done with real flair. 

RIP David Bowie: You remind me of the babe

Music, On my mind

Unless you’ve been living under a rock you’ll know… David Bowie died today finally losing his battle with cancer aged 69, and tributes flooded the internet because, despite what most of us like to think, Bowie was a freak. An oddity.

And we’re all odd freaks too (most of us), so we loved that he allowed us to embrace that. Simply put, he showed us the way – through his music, acting and constant reinvention. He took us to the heavens and the stars helping us expand our thinking, and he naval-gazed in his quieter moments, causing us to reflect inward and question ourselves.

On a personal level I discovered Bowie through old cassette tapes in my parent’s music collection. I had a listen and liked them, but didn’t quite ‘get it’, so put them aside and went back to my house records (I used to DJ a bit back then).

Then, around ten years later in my mid-20s, I found Bowie again.

Now I own an acoustic guitar and his songs had ways of finding me and making me sing alone in my room, expressing myself in a most liberating manner. From Space Oddity to A Man Who Sold The World to Starman, I sang my little heart out. What music was this? It was glorious and timeless (but in a good way, not a stuffy, Antiques Roadshow kind of way).

Then I became aware of his work in film, watching him steal scenes in The Prestige opposite Hugh Jackman. And so I revisited an ’80s, coming-of-age classic, The Labyrinth, where he was something of a force of nature, strutting his stuff in leather trousers opposite a young Jennifer Connelly.

I could go on… and on. But, well, you get it. If Bowie meant something to you then he meant something to you. And he kind of meant something to a great many of us, in profoundly different ways.

So, as tribute, below are a selection of clips that meant something to me.

Rest in peace David Bowie, you’re now among the stars.

 

The washed-up DJ

Poetry

You’ve been left behind, you’re obsolete.
Downbeat and no longer discreet, you desperately scratch the needle in search of the beat.
You’ve let your skills slip. Now all you taste is defeat.
Hard truth is… you can’t compete.
Battling bottom tier DJs, the best you can manage is a dead heat.
Your career in a downward spiral, forever stuck on repeat.
So you switch from vinyl to CDJs, taking dead-end gigs just to make ends meet.

What the hell happened?
You were once top of your game, destined for greatness.
Now you’re aimless, contagious.
People keep their distance, not wanting to be infected by your lameness.
So you become shapeless and faceless, a ghost and a cipher.
Question is, will you bounce back?
Are you a fighter and a survivor?
Are you fierce like a tiger?
An assassin sniper… with rival DJs caught in your crosshairs.
Blinded by lights as paps snap you with their lens flare.

Or are you destined for weddings and kid’s discos?
Forced into fiscal limbo as you blast out the Thong Song by Sisqo.
Watching pensioners dance the calypso to your tired, old beats.
You do whatever it takes to bring in cash.
Whatever keeps you off those cold, dark streets.
But you yearn for your heyday where you had the crowd in your hand.
Then you’d adjourn to the melee of your villa to get rowdy with your fans.
Then fall asleep, kept warm by the heat of your groupies.
The comedown from your set hitting you harder than a bowl of roofies.

But those days are gone, you’ll never get them back.
The clubbing world has moved on.
You have to face that fact.
So either pack it all in or accept your path.
Playing tunes to pensioners ain’t that bad, it’s kind of a laugh.
So that’s where you’ll stay.
Maybe one day, with hope, you’ll get another chance.
Reliving the glory days as a DJ superstar.

Amy: the girl with demons that were just too dark to overcome

Film

From great pain comes great genius. And let’s not muck about, Amy Winehouse, the gobby girl from North London, the unassuming jazz singer, had both in buckets.

This documentary – directed by Asif Kapadia, the man who brought us Senna a few years back – charts her life through mostly previously unseen footage in a compelling and deeply affecting way.

I’ll say from the outset I was – and still am – a big fan.

I loved her music, that unique and beguiling voice, the darkness she carried that came out in her lyrics and – this may seem callous but – I cannot think of another artist that, if they died, I’d be that cut up about. There was obviously something about her that spoke to me.

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Darkness, pain, loneliness, vulnerability – these things can mean a lot to a lot of people and Amy was our figurehead. When she died it was a shock, although the act not shocking in itself. More that maybe it hadn’t happened sooner, in a way, given the media frenzy which surrounded her later years (which we’ll come to in a bit).

With Amy we get a detailed insight into her inner circle, the people closest to her and how her eventual demise came to pass. From her friends and various managers and producers to her absent family, all seemed to play a part in trying to help her get back on track, but almost all ultimately failed her in some way.

And some more than others.

The person that got cast in the worst light was probably her father, Mitch Winehouse (who came out after the film’s release, surprisingly enough, saying he wanted the filmmakers to make changes). With her most famous song, Rehab, directly referencing the fact he told her not to go, he had dealt his own hand in terms of how he wanted to be portrayed as a father. This absenteeism as a role model for Amy continued right up until the end.

amy-winehouse

In fact, time and again Kapadia comes back to clips that illustrate the fact that most of Amy’s darkness and self-destructive impulses stemmed from the lack of a father figure in her life. Starting with Mitch leaving the family to have an affair whilst she was growing up, she then spent the rest of her life trying to replace him, either with boyfriends/husbands (Blake Fielder-Civil being the worst of the bunch) or managers and producers or, near the end, bodyguards.

The media also comes under Kapadia’s scrutiny (and rightly so), with the rise of the paparazzi scrum hounding her every move directly contributing to her downward spiral. (In some ways the same thing happened with Princess Diana, so it’s clear we’ll never learn.) In this Kapadia makes us complicit, we’re just as much to blame as anyone within her inner circle. We buy the magazines and read the tabloids and gobble up all the sordid details of her destruction like sharks out for blood.

The sucker punch, the killer blow if you will, was that Amy almost turned a corner right before the end. She did a duet with her idol Tony Bennett (who said she was up there with greats like Ella Fitzgerald) and she planned, by the looks of it, to return to her jazz roots. But then, in a flash, it was all over.

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If you were a fan of Amy Winehouse you’ll most likely find the film engaging and insightful. If you weren’t, you’ll still get something from it, as it’s a fascinating look at the recent and tragic demise of a modern-day musical genius and the factors that contributed to her downfall.

Kapadia seems to have treated the material sensitively and portrayed Amy in a sympathetic light. Whether you choose to – as I do – feel a little responsible and quite disgusted by the way the world ended up treating her will be up to you.

For me, it made me raw again that she’s gone. But this was an important film to make and the story needed to be told.

Rest in peace Amy. We’ll miss you, always.

Whiplash: Who knew jazz could be so brutal?

Film

His knees weak, arms are heavy, vomit on his sweater, mom’s spaghetti… Sorry, lost myself in the moment there.

Short of a hoodie and a rap battle, there’s a lot of similarities to be drawn between Whiplash and 8 Mile. In fact, any sports movie (if you consider freestyle rapping a sport). There’s blood, sweat and tears aplenty. Not what you’d expect from jazz, but then you don’t even have to like or appreciate jazz to enjoy this film. What you do have to like – and what it comes down to – is the will to win, to succeed, to be the best whatever it takes. To really dig deep.

Beyond that it’s essentially a character study.

whiplash-videoSixteenByNine1050

We start with music student Andrew Neiman (Miles Teller) furiously practicing his drumming, then in walks feared and revered teacher Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons), who gives him a mini grilling then leaves, clearly unimpressed, returning briefly – as Andrew’s face lights up – only to say he forgot his coat.

In this opening scene we’re introduced to the main characters, we find out who they are, their motivations and their attitude – all within a few short lines of dialogue. Great screenwriting from Damien Chazelle (who also directs this). This also sets the scene for what follows. Neiman eventually does enough to work his way into Fletcher’s sought-after studio band, but then that’s when the hard work really starts.

whiplash-review-kaelan-unrau

If you’ve ever had a tough boss count yourself lucky. They all pale in comparison to Simmons’ ferocious Fletcher. Not since the drill sergeant in Full Metal Jacket have we witnessed characters be subject to such abuse. Yet Neiman comes back for more. He wants to be the best and, deep down, he knows that if he meets Fletcher’s exacting standards, he will be.

The other students in the class are scared to death of Fletcher, yet Neiman has an inner fire that sets him apart and he gives as good as he gets. As an actor, Teller is a bit of a rising star. He’s been in Rabbit Hole, Footloose and Divergent, and he’s soon to be seen in Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four reboot. He also has a musical background (as a drummer for a church youth group band), which clearly stood him in good stead for the drumming scenes, which are frenetic, frenzied and exhilarating.

whip

The camera circles Neiman during many of these scenes where Fletcher tests his mettle, screaming at him to drum faster. He’s soaked in sweat with blood dripping off his hands. These scenes could be at home in a boxing movie (Rocky, we’re looking at you) but in jazz it’s somehow all the more frightening.

If you had to explain this film to someone you’d probably end up doing a poor job. ‘Well it’s about jazz and drumming and a guy who wants to be a jazz drummer and, er, that’s about it.’ So plot wise it’s not too dense. But, as I said earlier, it’s a character driven film, so plot is somewhat incidental.

And as the drums roll and the sparks between student and teacher fly, all the way up to the film’s finale, you’ll be utterly hooked. You’ll come out exhausted and elated and emotionally drained – and quite possibly never look at a cymbal in the same way again. And those reactions – all of them – will be very much a good thing.

Frank: what doesn’t kill you makes you stranger

Film, Music

A man wearing a giant fake head. A band full of oddballs, real oddballs. Is this a film about those characters we meet in life – if we’re lucky enough – that exist at the edges of normal?

Based on the real life experiences of writer Jon Ronson, Frank starts with Jon (Domhnall Gleeson), a talentless wannabe musician who, through a chance encounter with a band manager, gets to play keyboard in the supremely odd band with an unpronounceable name, headed by front-man Frank (Michael Fassbender). Job interview: ‘Can you play C, F and G? You’re in.’

Jon plays one gig then gets offered another and jumps at it, only to discover the band are heading off to the woods and will leave once the album is recorded.frank

Gleeson is a great fit for Jon. He needs to be likeable, but also a little offbeat. And, whilst Fassbender’s Frank is the enigmatic and mercurial figure that steals scenes – waving his arms dancing wildly, finding musical inspiration in everyday objects, addressing a German family in their native tongue – it’s Jon that drives the story.

This is his tale and experience of trying to fit into a group that themselves don’t fit into the world. And there’s the rub. Jon wants to be one of them but wants notoriety, which puts him at odds with the band, particularly the volatile Clara (Maggie Gyllenhaal).

His efforts lead them to a festival in the US and it’s here where the film comes somewhat undone, losing the focus it had in the early half. Screenwriters Jon Ronson and Peter Straughan (the chaps behind The Men Who Stare At Goats) perhaps lost their way.

Or maybe it’s just the case that these characters work better in a tighter, simpler setting. Maybe that’s the point the filmmakers were trying to make – one echoed by Gyllenhaal’s Clara – but it didn’t entirely hold together leading up to the film’s final scene.

Tonally though, this movie is interesting and puts me in mind of Little Miss Sunshine or The Life Aquatic. It’s been described as a musical comedy which, in some instances, is accurate (it has music and comedy), but it’s perhaps more tragic in tone. Frank is the sort of role you might expect Johnny Depp to have played, so it’s refreshing to see someone like Fassbender take it on and add another string to his mighty acting bow.

Ultimately there’s a fair amount to love about this film and feels like you’d get more out of it on repeat viewings. It’s a little slow in places (some of the middle and most of the final third), but it’s highly original and quirky, albeit not hugely cinematic. And Fassbender can definitely do quirky, who knew. Now, if only someone could cast him in a Wes Anderson movie.

Who loves a good chant?

Best Of lists

rufio__oPtWhether it’s for comedy purposes or to build the tension in a thriller or horror, a nice memorable phrase repeated over and over has a certain unrelenting quality to it – something is going to happen and chances are it won’t be good for the person on the receiving end. Here are some of my favourites:

Warriors… come out to play!
Picture the scene in this 1979 cult classic, The Warriors: framed for the murder of Cyrus (the most powerful gang leader in New York) the Warriors battle it across the city to get back to their home turf on Coney island. Only to find their bitter rival, Luther – leader of the Rogues and the man who actually killed Cyrus – blocking their path and demanding a fight. Director Walter Hill masterfully cranks up the tension with Luther creepily tapping bottles together and chanting in a bizarre and deranged manner.


Rufio versus Pan

What’s the best way to make an entrance at the end of the ’80s/early ’90s? On a skateboard of course. Then onto a trapeze and into a backflip. Then draw a sword. Who wouldn’t want to be leader of the Lost Boys? Growing up, Spielberg’s Hook in 1991 was a treat and Rufio was super cool – every young lad wanted to be him. In these scenes Rufio makes his entrance and taunts Pan (Robin Williams), then loses to him in a battle of words; a point where Peter begins to believe and the Lost Boys switch their allegiance.


The greater good

Mmmm, a murderous cult. What we learn in this scene is that killing is ok if it’s for ‘the greater good’ and said in chanted unison. Here Sergeant Nicholas Angel (Simon Pegg) faces off against the town’s village council in Hot Fuzz (2007), having worked out that they’d been behind a slew of killings… all in the name of ‘the greater good’. Creepy, yet brilliantly funny.


Frank the tank

‘You know it! When it hits your lips!’ When Old School was released in 2003 it was a bit of a sleeper hit. The modern brat pack of Vince Vaughn and co were just getting going, but one man stood out beyond all others. Will Ferrell aka Frank the tank. Gaining his name downing beer at a frat party. Reminds me of that alcholic’s phrase, ‘one is too many, two is not enough.’


Kali Ma

Growing up most of us remember Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (great title); specifically the moment Indy witnesses human sacrifice with a guy getting his heart torn out. Quite horrific to watch as a kid, but mesmerising. Here’s an idea… Chant ‘kali ma’ in a creepy way whilst moving your hand towards a friend’s chest and see if they freak out.


Give him fur black as black

Hocus Pocus in 1993 was – and still is I guess – a bit of a guilty pleasure, with Bette Midler on fine form as the head of a coven of witches (one of which included a young Sarah Jessica Parker). In this scene early in the film she turns a young chap into a black cat with a nice little, suitably witch-y chant. ‘Give him fur black as black just, like, this.’


Beetlejuice… Beetlejuice… Beetlejuice

‘Jump in the line, rock your body on time. Ok, I believe you!’ There’s so many great scenes, songs and dialogue from this film. From the possessed dinner party chanting and singing ‘Day-O’ dance to the aforementioned ‘Shake Senora’ calypso finish, it’s movie gold. Beetlejuice is also let out to play by saying his name three times. Go on, try it.


You shall not pass

Not sure if this counts as chanting, more booming. But it’s Sir Ian McKellen as Gandalf against a Balrog, c’mon! I think just before his immortal line there’s a chant. I mean, I wouldn’t mess with someone that says they’re the servant of the secret fire, would you?

Film composers – cinema’s unsung heroes?

Music, My musings

John-Williams-and-Steven-Spielberg-john-williams-25180335-2100-1869If I weren’t a director, I would want to be a film composer.” Steven Spielberg

Would great films be great without great scores? Hard to know really. What I do know is that us humans are emotive creatures. Whilst visual images are often arresting, music cuts to the bone. It sears the soul in ways that, sometimes, visual cannot.

Indeed, there’s something about music that taps into our psyche, lighting the blue touch paper of deep-seated emotions, ones we often thought previously walled off or under control. Such is its power. And the way it unearths memories and emotions is uncanny, particularly when linked to powerful visuals.

John Williams
Considered to be one of the greatest film composers of all time; Williams is largely responsible for composing the music to some of the biggest films of all time: Star Wars, Superman, Jaws, Indiana Jones, ET, Jurassic Park, Harry Potter – his body of work is phenomenal. He’s won 5 Oscars, 4 Golden Globes, 7 BAFTAs, 21 Grammy awards; and been nominated a staggering 48 times, second only to Walt Disney. Still, my rambling on will hardly give him fitting tribute. So I leave that to this a capella montage or Williams conducting below.


John Barry

They call him Barry, John Barry. Arguably most well known for his work on the James Bond films, Barry worked on an impressive 12 Bonds, from Dr No in 1962 to The Living Daylights in 1987. And if that wasn’t enough, he also scored Born Free, Out of Africa, Dances with Wolves and many more; plus won 5 Oscars, 2 BAFTAs and a Golden Globe.


Hans Zimmer
As far as composers go, Hans Zimmer is truly special. He may even be my favourite. He’s scored True Romance – one of my favourite films – with its irreverent little melody. Something which, oddly, may have influenced his work the following year on The Lion King. Then there’s Gladiator, Pirates of the Caribbean, Batman Begins, The Dark Knight, Inception, The Dark Knight Rises, Rush and Man of Steel. He’s won 4 Grammy awards, 3 classical Brit awards, 2 Golden Globes and an Oscar.


Howard Shore

Shore’s a heavy hitter in the world of film composing. 3 Oscars, 3 Golden Globes, 4 Grammy awards. Not bad going. He’s worked extensively with David Cronenberg and also with David Fincher on films like Seven. So many were surprised, given his love of dark scores, that he bagged The Lord of the Rings gig. However, his work on this trilogy was out of this world. Beautiful, beautiful music.


Alan Silvestri

Good teamwork, that’s what it’s all about. Teaming directors with cinematographers and composers – letting their individual brilliance shine through. In this case Silvestri’s pairing with director Robert Zemeckis has, over the years, resulted in some wonderful scores: Back to the Future, Forest Gump and Flight to name a few.

Best use of 80s electro songs in film

Best Of lists, Music

renton and diane

Ok, here are the rules. The songs had to have been released in the ’80s, but could have been used in any films during this time. Whether they introduce or accentuate a scene, or were the film’s theme song, each track is special to me in some way. Here’s my list:

‘Atomic’ by Blondie (1980)Trainspotting
This takes place in the Volcano club where Renton sees Diane and falls in love. Cue spaghetti western style guitar hook with sharp and punchy disco beats and Blondie’s warbling vocals.

‘What A Feeling’ by Irene Cara (1983)Flashdance
Damn Robert Webb’s sexy moves. If you can get past his version this was a great theme song, equally good as a stand-alone track without the dancing. It’s uplifting and empowering and arguably the female ‘Eye of the Tiger’ power song.

‘It’s A Sin’ by the Pet Shop Boys (1987)Bronson
If you’re a fan of Nicholas Winding Refn’s Drive you have to ensure you see his earlier film, Bronson, with Tom Hardy. Watch the psychiatric hospital scene. A scene that was expertly lifted by canny use of a killer track.

‘Don’t Go’ by Yazoo (1982)Tango & Cash
In this film we have both Kurt Russell and Teri Hatcher sporting some truly fantastic hair – all framed perfectly by Yazoo’s urgent, punchy track.

‘Together In Electric Dreams’ by Philip Oakey (1984)Electric Dreams
Trying to emulate the success of Flashdance, Oakey of The Human League recorded this in ten minutes. It worked too, becoming a bigger hit than the film it was promoting.

‘Love Will Tear Us Apart’ by Joy Division (1980)Donnie Darko
This track gets used in a pivotal scene where Donnie has to abandon his girlfriend in order to save her. One of Gyllenhaal’s best and most intelligent films to date.

‘Push It To The Limit’ by Paul Engemann (1983) – Scarface
Everyone loves an ’80s montage scene right? This one expertly frames Tony Montana’s rise to the top of the drugs world, as he consolidates his wealth and power.

‘Axel F’ by Harold Faltermeyer (1985)Beverly Hills Cop
I almost forgot this film and theme song, for shame! The ‘Crazy Frog’ version nearly ruined my affection for this track, but thankfully it was rekindled by the Peter Griffin rendition.

‘A View To A Kill’ by Duran Duran (1985)A View to a Kill
Peppered with sharp, urgent notes, this epic track perfectly captured the spirit of Bond during his ’80s pomp. For your listening pleasure, here’s the video.

‘Magic Dance’ by David Bowie (1986)Labyrinth
Despite the backing track sounding like it was lifted straight from a Cyndi Lauper record, it’s still a complete classic from a defining coming-of-age film for 80s kids like myself.

I’d loved to have included ‘Nightcall’ by Kavinsky, the theme to Drive, but it was released in 2010. It’s hypnotic, ethereal and very 80s.

So there’s my list. Any I missed you’d have liked to have seen?

brisfest 2012

Brisfest 2012: A twisted tale of badgers and burlesque

Music

brisfest 2012Along with 20,000 other music fans, I attended the first day of Brisfest music festival yesterday.

For those unaware of its origins it was created following the demise of the Ashton Court Festival, which started in the 1970s but was unable to continue as a free event and sadly closed.

brisfest 2012Organisers created Brisfest in 2007 to ensure the survival of a not-for-profit music festival in the city. Whilst previously held elsewhere, 2012 saw the event head to the picturesque Ashton Court Estate for the first time.

The festival’s aim is to support music, dance, art and food across the south west, with emphasis on local talent. That said, the increase in scale has seen it attract big-name headline acts this year including De La Soul, Roni Size and more.

brisfest 2012Yesterday myself and fellow festival goers were blessed with some great weather for this sold out event. Initially our group spent the afternoon wandering around soaking up the atmosphere: meeting colourful characters, posing with burlesque dancers, interrogating badgers and women on stilts, you know the drill.

Then, as darkness fell and everyone you know becomes an impossible-to-distinguish silhouette, the big acts stepped up. The penultimate act on the main stage was Beardyman. He delivered a bouncy, energetic set, using his unique set of beatbox skills and live looping.

brisfest 2012
He’s captivating to watch, half the time you forget he’s producing sounds and beats with that level of complexity using just a microphone. Check out a clip from his performance at Camp Bestival a few years ago. Unparalleled.

Then came the headline act, Jaguar Skills. A mash up DJ that rose to fame through mixtapes and hip hop. I consider him the lovechild of A-Trak, Skrillex and DJ Yoda. That may give some of you an idea of his style. If not, you’ll have to look those guys up and decide for yourself.

His Brisfest set was a montage of random voiceover clips and 70s and 80s samples, cut into fairly hard, aggressive, down and dirty dubstep. Check out this clip, the sound isn’t great but you get the idea.

I feel for the brave festival attendees today, the weather was awful. To compensate, they had a great lineup to close proceedings, in particular De La Soul who I imagine were wicked.

All in all yesterday – for me – was an enjoyable day. Cool music, crazy people and sunshine, what more could you ask for from a UK festival?

Jaguar Skills – listen and download a sample set here: